Just Wondering

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Gary Puckett
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Just Wondering

Postby Gary Puckett » Mon, Aug 24 2009, 7:26PM

I have a project, and to be truthful I don't have a lot of faith in my finishing skills. The project is a piece of furniture( a flat screen TV lift ) and it must match the surrounding furniture, the back will look like the front but will be doors. I have inquired on a price for a pro.Finisher to do this and I am getting a price from $600.00 to $750.00. WOW does that seem high to anybody else?

The piece is 58" long X 47" tall and 19" deep it is made out of cherry
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Jason Susnjara
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Re: Just Wondering

Postby Jason Susnjara » Thu, Aug 27 2009, 9:02AM

Hi Gary,

Depending on the type of finish and the steps used, I think it could easily cost that amount especially if they need to formulate the stain (glaze and pad if needed) to match. For instance, when we were finishing some furniture pieces years ago, we would use 10 to 12 steps which would require sanding in between, wool highlights, etc.. Here is a schedule that we used for some cherry pieces that Valspar came up with and if I remember correctly, the cost for the supplies alone were a few hundred dollars not counting labor. Now if you were doing a simple 3 step process then that price might be overkill but this is my opinion and have been out of the finishing area for a while.


1. Prep Sand Use 150 or 180

2. Sap Stain
Spray even coat on light wood following grain.
10 minutes air-dry.
Light steel wool if needed

3. NGR Stain
Spray even wet coat following grain.
10 minutes air-dry.

4. Spray Stain
Spray even wet coat following grain.
Air-dry 30min
Highlight with steel wool or sand

5. Washcoat
Spray even wet coat following grain.
Air-dry 30min.
Sand 320
Wipe Clean

6. Glaze
Neutral (Inert) Glaze
Spray on wet
Wipe in circular motion then wipe clean with grain
Brush Blend
Wool highlight
Air-dry 30min

7. Sealer
Spray even wet coat following grain.
Air-dry 30min.
Sand 320
Wipe Clean

8. Topcoat
Spray even wet coat following grain.
Air-dry 30min
Sand 320
Wipe Clean

9. Antique Pad
Rub overall

10. Dry brush
Dab on with 2” brush
Brush blend with 4” brush
Air-dry 30min.

11. Topcoat
Spray even wet coat following grain.
Air-dry 30min

12. 2nd Topcoat (Optional)
Spray even wet coat following grain.
Air-dry 30min
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Thermwood Corp.

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Peter Walsh
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Re: Just Wondering

Postby Peter Walsh » Thu, Aug 27 2009, 9:04PM

Gary,
I agree with Jason. I have done multi step finishing to match existing. It ALWAYS takes longer than you expect.
regards,

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Gary Puckett
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Re: Just Wondering

Postby Gary Puckett » Fri, Aug 28 2009, 8:34AM

Jason,

Thanks for all the information, but what the heck is all that stuff :? I guess I was looking at just having to mix the stain color, appling the stain and then top coat.

I know you are very busy but I would like to know what some of that stuff is like Sap Stain, NGR Stain, Antique pad. Also I thought you did a wash coat before you applied the stain to try and prvent bloching.

Gary
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Re: Just Wondering

Postby Jason Susnjara » Fri, Aug 28 2009, 8:55AM

Hi Gary,

From your first post, I figured that for the price given they were going to apply a muliplte step finish and not just a stain and topcoat. These are steps that Valspar created for us and we have not really had problems with blotching. I think we have a few formulas where the washcoat (or sometimes sealer) is before the stain but maybe that's because of the Sap, NGR?



Sap Stain - spray even coat on the light wood only to equalize the piece
NGR - this is like a primer (deep penetrating dye stain) that is applied to all surfaces and most of the time will look orange in color
Glaze - Generally sprayed on and then a rag is used to remove the excess. Gives the piece a deeper look then just a stain
Antique Pad - Nothing more than alcohol mixed with some dyes that is applied to the entire piece using a rag. Dries very quickly becasue of the alcohol and gives the piece an antique look
Dry Brush - similar if not the same as the glaze that is applied on with a brush. Generally applied to corners and around carvings to give it a 3 dimensional look
Jason Susnjara
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Re: Just Wondering

Postby DanEpps » Fri, Aug 28 2009, 3:24PM

Sap: soaks into the sap wood more to provide an even color
NGR: Non-grain raising


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